Connect with us

Calling Addiction A Disease May Be a Roadblock

calling addiction a disease impacts getting help

Around The Web

Calling Addiction A Disease May Be a Roadblock

Word balloons without words. Do messages prevent treatment credit adobe

Calling Addiction A Disease May Be a Roadblock

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

A decade ago some experts were concerned that calling addiction a disease would both stigmatize it further and prevent people from seeking help. Why? If it's a disease, you're not responsible for it. It is what is.

This ignore-it attitude about substance and alcohol addiction was prevalent throughout the ages before there were any effective treatments for it. But now, some 23 million people are in some form of recovery from addiction to substances and alcohol. Why should changing a definition to calling addiction a disease impact people's desire to get help?

If people felt that way about physical diseases like cancer, or heart disease, or pneumonia, we might have greater epidemics of those diseases, too. The addiction epidemic is growing because we're not messaging recovery correctly. Are we adequately showing that recovery works? Are we providing adequate access to all the forms of treatment people need? Positive messaging may provide hope. It would be a start.

From Science Daily

Research finds that people with substance-use problems who read a message describing addiction as a disease are less likely to report wanting to engage in effective therapies, compared to those who read a message that addiction behaviors are subject to change. The finding could inform future public and interpersonal communication efforts regarding addiction.

"When we began talking about addiction as a disease, the goal was to decrease stigma and encourage treatment," says Sarah Desmarais, coauthor of a paper on the work and an associate professor of psychology at North Carolina State University. "That worked, to an extent, but an unforeseen byproduct was that some people experiencing addiction felt like they had less agency; people with diseases have no control over them."

"We wanted to see if an alternative message aimed at changing that mindset could affect how people with substance-use problems viewed themselves with regard to addiction," says Jeni Burnette, first author of the paper and an associate professor of psychology at NC State. "Specifically, we focused on using a growth mindset message. The growth mindset message stresses that human attributes are malleable, and we know from previous work that it encourages better self-regulatory strategies such as seeking helping from others."

For this study, the researchers enrolled 214 men and women who screened as positive for substance-use problems. One hundred and twenty-four of the study participants received the growth mindset message, whereas 90 participants received the message that addiction is a disease. The growth mindset article described various factors that can contribute to substance abuse, and stressed that there are multiple ways for people to address their addiction. The disease article described the changes in the brain that take place during addiction.

After reading their respective articles, participants in both groups completed a survey that asked them about how much they felt they could change their substance abuse; how confident they were in their ability to address the problem; how much they blamed themselves for their substance abuse; and the extent to which they planned to seek several types of treatment for addiction.

The researchers found that study participants who received the growth mindset message reported stronger growth mindsets and more confidence in their ability to handle their addiction, relative to the study participants who received the disease message. Importantly, there was no difference between the two groups regarding the extent to which they blamed themselves for their addiction.

"These findings are good news," Desmarais says. "We want people to feel empowered and confident to change their behavior, but not to feel guilty about it."

Additionally, participants in the growth mindset message group reported stronger intentions to seek counseling or cognitive-behavioral therapy, compared to the participants who got the disease message. There was no difference between groups when it came to seeking pharmacological treatment for addiction.

"It's promising to see the growth mindset group express a greater willingness to seek treatment via counseling or cognitive-behavioral therapy," Desmarais says. "And the lack of difference between groups on medication treatment is also good news, because it reflects the fact that both groups equally appreciate the medical aspects of addiction.

"Overall, our findings support moving away from messaging about addiction solely as a disease," Desmarais says. "It's more complicated than that. Instead, the finding suggests that it would be more helpful to talk about the many different reasons people become addicted."

"The findings also highlight the potential to use growth mindset interventions to help substance users engage in effective treatments," Burnette notes.

Story Source:

Materials provided by North Carolina State UniversityNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Comments

Continue Reading
You may also like...
mm

Leslie Glass is the founder of Reach Out Recovery and the winner of the 2016 ASAM Media Award. Leslie is also the creator of Recovery Guidance, the information website for those seeking addiction and mental healthcare for professionals nationwide. Leslie is a journalist, director/producer of award-winning documentaries, and the author of 15 bestselling novels. Leslie has served as Chairman of the Board of Plays For Living, was a member of the Board of Directors of Mystery Writers of America. She has served as a Public Member of the Middle States Commission of Higher Education, as a VP of The Asolo Theatre, and was a Trustee of the New York City Police Foundation.

More in Around The Web

Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement
To Top