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Women, Alcohol And Perceived ‘Sexual Availability’ –

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Women, Alcohol And Perceived ‘Sexual Availability’ –

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Women, Alcohol And Perceived ‘Sexual Availability’ –

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From The New York Times:

A new study finds that women who drink alcohol in social settings are seen as more “sexually available” and “less human.”

When Brock Turner, the former Stanford swimmer who was found guilty in 2016 of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman on campus, appealed his conviction, he and his lawyers devoted 60 pages to how intoxicated the victim seemed. He lost the appeal.

Last year, a Yale student, Saifullah Khan, was found not guilty of sexually assaulting a fellow student. His lawyers worked relentlessly to discredit the account of the woman, repeatedly asking how much she’d had to drink.

Using alcohol to cast doubt on women’s reputations, particularly in cases of sexual assault, in court and in life is not rare. Now a new studyfrom researchers at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the University of Nebraska and Iowa State University finds that women who drink are in fact judged more harshly than men who do the same.

The study, titled “She Looks Like She’d Be an Animal in Bed: Dehumanization of Drinking Women in Social Contexts,” explored the stereotypes applied to women who drink and how presumptions of alcohol and sexual promiscuity go hand-in-hand. It was published in a May issue of the journal Sex Roles.

Researchers found that both women and men believed that a woman drinking alcohol in a social setting was more intoxicated than a man having the same drink, and that she was more “sexually available” and “less human” than a woman drinking water or a man drinking alcohol.

 

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